Schedule

More is coming with the schedule, but note that I’ve changed the dates/deadlines for the first short writing project!

Week 1 (September 4-September 6): Getting Started

Beginning Wednesday and finishing by Friday, do the following:

  • Class introductions, etc.
  • How to use wordpress.com
  • Read and discuss Dave Cormier’s “Rhizomatic Education: Community as Curriculum” (eReserves)

Week 2  (September 9 – September 13): Introducing Ancient Rhetoric

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday:

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

      • Read and discuss chapters 2 and 3 of Crowley and Hawhee Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students.
      • Read and discuss Kenneth Burke, “Introduction:  The Five Key Terms of Dramatism,” from A Grammar of Motives (eReserves)
      • Read and discuss Watson and Crick, “Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids” (eReserves)
      • Read and discuss Carolyn R. Miller, “Kairos in the Rhetoric of Science” (eReserves)

Week 3 (September 16 – September 20): Writing, Technology, and Logical Proof

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday:

      • Read and discuss selections from Plato’s Phaedrus.  See also John Zuern’s guide to Phaedrus and  the Wikipedia entry on this dialog.
      • Walter Ong’s “Writing is a Technology that Restructures Thought.” (eReserves)
      • Selections from Alexander Reid’s The Two Virtuals: New Media and Composition (eReserves)

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

      • Read and discuss chapters 4 and 5 of Crowley and Hawhee’s Ancient Rhetorics.
      • Read and discuss Walzer and Gross, “Positivists, Postmodernists, Aristotelians, and the Challenger Disaster.” (eReserves)

Week 4 (September 23 – September 27): Ethical, Pathetic, and Extrinsic Proofs

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday:

      • Read and discuss chapters 6 and 7 of Crowley and Hawhee’s Ancient Rhetorics.
      • Read and discuss S. Michael Halloran, “The Birth of Molecular Biology: An Essay in the Rhetorical Criticism of Scientific Discourse” (eReserves)
      • Read and discuss Marshall Myers, “The Use of Pathos in Charity Letters: Some Notes Toward a Theory and Analysis.” (eReserves)

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

Week 5 (September 30-October 4):  Arrangement, Style, Memory, and Delivery

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday:

      • Read and discuss chapters 9 through 12 of Crowley and Hawhee’s Ancient Rhetorics.

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

Week 6: (October 7-October 11): Peer review, Burke, and just what is “Science,” anyway?

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday:

      • Read and discuss Kenneth Burke, “Terministic Screens” (eReserves)
      • Read and discuss Michael J. Zerbe, “Chapter 1: The Dominance of Scientific Discourse: Theoretical Contexts,” from Composition and the Rhetoric of Science: Engaging the Dominant Discourse (eReserves)

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

      • Read and discuss R. Allen Harris, “Rhetoric of Science” (eReserves)
      • D.A. Winsor, “Communication Failures Contributing to the Challenger Accident: An Example for Technical Communicators.” (eReserves)

Week 7:  (October 14-October 18): “The Rhetorical Situation”

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday:

      • Read and discuss “The Character of the Rhetorical Situation”(an intro to the other readings on situation) and Lloyd Bitzer’s “The Rhetorical Situation” (eReserves)
      • Read and discuss Richard Vatz’s “The Myth of the Rhetorical Situation” (eReserves)
      • Read and discuss Scott Consigny’s “Rhetoric and Its Situations” (eReserves)*
      • Begin discussion/peer review of the first short rhetorical analysis projects by the end of the day on Wednesday, October 16!

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

      • Continue discussing first group of rhetorical situation readings.
      • End discussion/peer review of the first short rhetorical analysis projects by the end of the day on Friday, October 18!

Week 8:  (October 21-October 25): “The Rhetorical Situation” continued, a taste of usability

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday:

  • Read and discuss Barbara Biesecker’s “Rethinking the Rhetorical Situation From Witihin the Thematic of Différance” (eReserves)
  • Read and discuss Jenny Edbauer’s “Unframing Models of Public Distribution: From Rhetorical Situation to Rhetorical Ecologies” (eReserves)

Wednesday, October 23: First Short Rhetorical Analysis Due!

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

Week 9: (October 28-November 1): Latour

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday

  • Begin reading and discussing selection from Bruno Latour’s Science in Action:  How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society (eReserves)

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

  • Finish reading and discussing selection from Bruno Latour’s Science in Action:  How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society (eReserves)
  • Jim Johnson (aka Bruno Latour).  “Mixing Humans and Nonhumans Together:  The Sociology of a Door-Closer.” (eReserves)
  • Possible readings TBA

Week 10: (November 4-November 8): Agency, Artifacts, and Nonhumans Part 1

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday

  • Carolyn Miller’s “What Can Automation Tell Us About Agency?” (eReserves)
  • Langdon Winner, “Do Artefacts Have Politics?” (eReserves)

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

Week 11: (November 11-November 15): Agency, Artifacts, and Nonhumans Part 2

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday:

  • Steve Woolgar and Geoff Cooper, “Do Artefacts Have Ambivalence? Moses’ Bridges, Winner’s Bridges and Other Urban Legends in S&TS” (eReserves)
  • (And possibly some TBA readings)

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

  • Marylin Cooper, “Rhetorical Agency as Emergent and Enacted” (eReserves)
  • (And possibly some TBA readings)

Week 12: (November 18-November 22): Circumnavigation

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday

  • Read and begin discussing “Introduction: Circumnavigation” from Thomas Rickert’s Ambient Rhetoric. (eReserves)

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

  • Continue discussing selection from Ambient Rhetoric.

Week 13: (November 25-November 26): Prepping for Project #2

Begin Monday and complete by Tuesday:

  • Second short project “pitch.” We will have a discussion about the second short rhetorical analysis project.

Wednesday November 27 through November 29: Thanksgiving Break

Week 14: (December 2 – December 6): A Few Visusals

Begin by Monday and complete by Wednesday

  • Roland Barthes.  “Rhetoric of the Image.” (eReserves)
  • Stephen Bernhardt. “The Shape of Text to Come: The Texture of Print on Screens.” (eReserves)
  • Begin discussion/peer review of the second short rhetorical analysis projects by the end of the day on Wednesday, December 4!

Begin by Wednesday and complete by Friday:

  • Edward Tufte. “The Decision to Launch the Space Shuttle Challenger,” from Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative. (eReserves)
  • Watch and discuss Logorama
  • Finish discussion/peer review of the second short rhetorical analysis projects by the end of the day on Friday, December 6!

Week 15: (December 9-December 12): Wrapping up the second short analysis and introducing the final

  • Monday, December 9: Wrap-up of remaining discussions and other remaining/outstanding projects.
  • Discuss the take-home final.
  • Tuesday, December 10: Second short rhetorical analysis due!
  • Thursday, December 12: Second half of the semester participation grade email discussion is due.
  • Thursday, December 12: Last day of class and “take-home”/electronic final distributed!

Finals Week: The end of Time!!

  •  Second short rhetorical analysis projects returned!
  • The “take-home”/electronic final is due on December 17, 2014 at 5 pm Michigan time. This is the “end of time” for the semester!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *